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Babies who don't crawl have difficulties reading Rss

Hi All,

I have been recently told that crawling is a very important milestone as it affects the child's ability to read. This is due to the fact that crawling connects the left and right side of the brain, which is required for reading.

I had never heard this in my life but was surprised after a google search to find lots of professionals agreeing with the theory.

Personally, I am not at all convinced. I would have thought reading to your child, encouraging them with language and helping them to write is the way to go to help with reading!!

Is there truth in this theory or is it something thought up by professionals with far too much time on their hands......??
I have heard of this, I mentioned to my Dr that my dd wasn't crawling at 9 months and she told me about it, she also said that babies usually do a lot of other things that stimulate both sides of the brain and make up for the absence or late crawling. My dd started crawling not long after and I didn't worry about it, I can see how it is true though.
Wow. I have never heard this either.
I know that crawling does help the two sides of the brain to work together, but I would never have made that connection myself. Makes sense though I suppose....




"Parenting is the easiest thing in the world to have an opinion about, but the hardest thing in the world to do."

Well that theory doesn't apply to my child - she didn't crawl til 12 months because she was a chubby thing and couldn't be bothered. Once she did start crawling she walked by 13 months. She's 4 and a half now and reads and writes a handful of words, and has done for 6 months.

She can write her name, plus mum, dad, nan, pa, dog, cat, ant, hat, mat, sat, bat and her friends name Zali. She loves reading and writing & never had any issues with it. She's still not a highly physical kinda kid - she prefers art and craft over racing around and playing sports.




I've heard this too.

My son didn't crawl and is learning to read- and can read 3-4 letter words quite well considering we started more structured teaching around his 4th b'day 'cos he asked me to teach him.(a few weeks ago) He loves it and seems to pick it up quite quickly. And he can actually spell words out- not just word recognition.

We've always read to him and pointed out letters to him and answered all his questions and played word games with him.

i also have a friend who tried to make her child crawl for this reason (he didn't want to - just wanted to walk) He is 5 1/2 and also loves reading.
It is true that crawling connects the left and right brain but there are also loads of other things that babies do that connect them too.
nope lies I walked before I crawled I can read fine always have my problem was my left and rights took me longer to know which is which and sometimes when Im put on the spot I have to stop and think
I actually thought it was more a maths related thing, rather than reading problems. My DH didn't crawl, and I have to say his maths skills are awful (uses his fingers for simple addition, such as working out the margin in football games). It's not as if he is not clever, as he is university educated with a professional job, BUT he is not very good at basic maths. I also heard, the longer you crawl for, the better you become at maths. Doesn't matter how late crawling began, just the length. Now, comparing myself with my siblings, this is true also.

Eve75

Ahhh an interesting topic smile

My son has been seeing a behavioural optometrist. She will explain this a lot better than me but she put it as a lot of kids don't spend long enough at various stages as babies (crawling is a big one, but also rolling and other things that help develop left/right brain connections). A lot of learning issues presented in those early years she thinks are often correlated with some kids missing out (or not spending long enough) on some early year milestone steps that help to develop those connections

My DS1 for instance when she first saw him he had to do focusing exercises, his lips would unconciously twitch, his jaw would move in the direction his eyes had to follow ... some kids entire heads move while. These primal instincts naturally disappear as the brain connections mature, so kids displaying these reactions at age 4, 5, 6 etc need extra work in going back a few steps to rectify those connections - which in turn helps with their learning at school. My DS' have been doing a 'Move to Learn' program at his school since prep. It is all about kids doing basic exercises for about 10 mins to improve the left/right brain connections (one of the exercises is crawling - firstly with same hand and knee together, then they have to focus on crawling with opposite hand and knee together, others are flip flops, rolling type exercises). They have gotten huge results out of some kids who've done this program.

I haven't explained this as well as this lady does. But it does make complete sense the way she says it ... so to answer your question ... YES. I personally do believe their is a link with what you are saying.
My sister is primary teacher and has also done a lot of study in this area and says there is definitely a correalation between babies who never crawl and a number of mental and physical issues ranging from difficulties to learning to read, write, do maths and a lack of physical coordination. Of course it is more complicated than just not crawling but it definitely seems to be a contributing factor.

Well that theory doesn't apply to my child - she didn't crawl til 12 months because she was a chubby thing and couldn't be bothered. Once she did start crawling she walked by 13 months. She's 4 and a half now and reads and writes a handful of words, and has done for 6 months.

She can write her name, plus mum, dad, nan, pa, dog, cat, ant, hat, mat, sat, bat and her friends name Zali. She loves reading and writing & never had any issues with it. She's still not a highly physical kinda kid - she prefers art and craft over racing around and playing sports.


Off subject but how did you start teaching your daughter to read & right, DS starts prep next year and I'm terrified he's going to be a long way behind everyone else

Robin


Off subject but how did you start teaching your daughter to read & right, DS starts prep next year and I'm terrified he's going to be a long way behind everyone else


Dd asked me to teach her to write.... I would never push it or try and make her do it if she didn't want to. We started with her name - I would do the letters in dots first, and she would trace over the dots to finish it off. Eventually she just started doing it herself, then would ask me to do dots for other words.

I wouldn't worry about your boy being behind as you put it... kids learn at different rates, and girls learn different to boys. I'll bet your boy has great coordination and can kick/catch a ball really well? I've always gone with the theory that we should encourage kids with what they're good at, and that will be enough to give them the confidence to try new things when they're ready. smile




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