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Is cornstarch the same as cornflour??? Rss

If not which aisle would I find cornstarch in the supermarket? Can you even buy it at the supermarket lol? Is it a powder or liquid?
As you can tell I've never used it lol
grin here is the answer I gave to the same question last week laugh

Generally speaking, yes. For the purposes of what you probably need it for (which I assume is a recipe using cornstarch as a thickener) the answer would be yes.


If you want to get really technical, "cornflour" is an ambiguous term that can refer to cornstarch or cornmeal. In Australia, cornflour is generally made from wheat, rather than maize. So it will ususally say "wheaten cornflour" on the pack, and in fact is in no way related to corn. Cornstarch (US term) is a similar product, but is actually derived from corn. In the US cornflour would mean cornmeal, which we call polenta! Are you confused yet?? lol.

<span class="emoticon grin">grin</span> here is the answer I gave to the same question last week <span class="emoticon laugh">laugh</span>

Generally speaking, yes. For the purposes of what you probably need it for (which I assume is a recipe using cornstarch as a thickener) the answer would be yes.


If you want to get really technical, "cornflour" is an ambiguous term that can refer to cornstarch or cornmeal. In Australia, cornflour is generally made from wheat, rather than maize. So it will ususally say "wheaten cornflour" on the pack, and in fact is in no way related to corn. Cornstarch (US term) is a similar product, but is actually derived from corn. In the US cornflour would mean cornmeal, which we call polenta! Are you confused yet?? lol.

It's actually to make clay to use with cookie cutters for Chrissy decorations for kids to then paint. THIS is the recipe i'm looking at. I've googled and from what Ican find they are the same thing, but you need 100% pure cornflour and white wings is the only brand that does this. Is that right?
I just make a salt dough for modelling etc.

This is the one I use

SALT DOUGH RECIPE:
2 cups of Plain Flour
1 cup of table salt
1 cup of water

OPTIONAL
1 tablespoon of vegetable oil (makes it a little easier to knead)
1 tablespoon of wallpaper paste (gives the mixture more elasticity)
1 tablespoon of lemon juice (makes the finished product harder)
METHOD
Put plain flour, salt and any, or all, of the optional ingredients into a mixing bowl and gradually add the water, mixing to soft dough. This should be neither too sticky, in which case add more flour, nor too dry, in which case add more water. When mixed remove from the bowl, place on a flat surface and knead for 10 minutes to help create a smooth texture. If possible it is best to let the dough stand for approximately twenty minutes before beginning a project. Unused dough can be stored in the fridge, in an airtight container or cling film, for up to a week. Children always love making models, and as long as you don’t add wallpaper paste all of the ingredients are natural. So if they are tempted to put it in their mouths, all it will do is taste incredibly salty.
DRYING
The drying of your work can either be done naturally in the open air, or it can be baked in an oven. However it is not recommended that you have your oven hotter than 100C as this can cause bubbles and cracks in your pastry. The drying time needed for each piece varies according to size and thickness, but an average time for natural drying is 30-48 hours, whilst oven times are generally reduced to 3-4 hours. These figures are only offered as a rough guide and remember that both sides must be dried out. When your model is dry, turn off the oven and leave it inside to cool down.

It's actually to make clay to use with cookie cutters for Chrissy decorations for kids to then paint. THIS is the recipe i'm looking at. I've googled and from what Ican find they are the same thing, but you need 100% pure cornflour and white wings is the only brand that does this. Is that right?

Yep I'd say it wants regular cornflour, and would be inclined to think the homebrand stuff would do just as good a job.
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