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  5. Does anyone else's bub have a flat head, what did you do about it?

Does anyone else's bub have a flat head, what did you do about it? Lock Rss

Hey, I have a gorgeous 14 week old boy Joshua and since he was 3 weeks I've noticed he had a flat spot on his head it's kind of like going diagonal from the back to the side if that makes sense. I took him to a child health care nurse who then referred me to a physiotherapist, all she said was not to worry that's what we have hair for to cover these things. I didn't feel happy with the lack of concern but just took it as a good thing. well since then at now 14 weeks it has gotten worse. I have been using the heart snapped pillow for flat head like they recommended and have been giving him lots of tummy time ive been putting him in in one of those round activity tables that they sit in with the toys and putting towels around him with no improvement. So my question is did your bub have flat head and did it get better on its own or did you have to take action and go with the helmet option? I would love any feedback. Thanks in advanced

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Hi there, another lovely lady on this forum has been on this journey with her son and knows a lot about it. I will send her a message to see if she can come on to chat to you. Otherwise here is her thread-

https://www.huggies.com.au/forum/1-baby/56-babys...

Hope this helps smile

I'll let you know if I hear back from her.
Thank you so much I really appreciate your help smile

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So welcome!

I just spoke to her she's going to come on smile
Ds favoured one side as a newborn as his shoulder distocia (sp?) caused muscle damage which shortened a muscle in his neck on one side and it was uncomfortable to stretch it out. I was told to do lots of tummy time and if he was on his back to gently turn his head to the other side and keep doing that regularly as he would turn back after a short time. They also got me to use rolled up blankets or hand towels and turn his body slightly to that side with the towel blanket behind him so he couldn't roll back. So he was on his back but the side he favoured was slightly raised enough that he couldn't just lie his head down on that side. They showed me other positions to put him in with the towel to support him also. They said not to just keep him off his head altogether but having him in positions that put pressure on the opposite side would help it even out. It did even out over time, will never be perfectly round but its not noticeable under his hair. All my info came from a CHN and she printed out a heap of pictures with ideas for different ways to keep him off that side or his head altogether. Maybe your CHN just wasn't very good with that sort of thing. But it is something you can easily work on yourself at home with the right info. You just need to keep on it. smile


Also when interacting with him do it from the opposite side. So if your on the floor with him stay on that side and talk to him, shake rattles, show him toys all on that side to he wants to look that way instead of turning to his favoured side


Hello mum2onelittleman, misskell sent me your post. My son is now 21 months old and he has had a very flat head at the back.

It was around the 12 week old mark that we started noticing and the midwives gave all these suggestions like the rolled up muslin wrap or towel to try to make him lay his head the other way, turning his head and repositioning it (neither of these worked, he just repositioned himself), moving the bassinet and/or laying him the other way in it to see if he would change sides (incase he was facing a direction where there was more light or something that made him feel more secure). We also tried the pillow with a hole in the middle and plenty of tummy time. Unfortunately it just got worse and there seem to be 2 camps in the medical field as to whether it's serious or not.

By the time we were given the helmet therapy option at 9-10 months it was almost too late due to waiting lists and timeframes needed before the fontanelle closes up. So our son did have helmet therapy which helped reshape the head a little but not too much. It was worth it to rectify some shape, as people were commenting and little children were coming up and saying things like he looked like an alien. My son also has hydrocephalus which is not related, so has a large head than normal anyway. Apparently its better to start helmet therapy earlier like at 6-7 months I think.

I would recommend seeing a paediatrician and asking them about whether to see a physio as I think there are also some exercises you can try. It's worth getting it checked that it's not something else and to rule out any problems. The earlier they start observing things the sooner they will be able to make some decisions further down the track, giving you plenty of time if something like helmet therapy can work. It's a bit hit and miss with doctors though as not all believe in the effectiveness of helmet therapy.

Anyway I hope these ideas help and if I think of any others I'll let you know. My son was born early and they said the bone is softer and this is one cause of the flat head, plus he slept on his back like the midwives say they should to help prevent SIDS.
Hi, my DD is the same she is 10 weeks old and has a flat spot on her head and only turns her head to the right. I took her to an osteopath last week who did some manipulation on her neck (not as painful as it sounds) the osteopath said its likeDD has a stiff neck, she did ask me if DD was engaged for a long period which she was. I have noticed over the weekend that she is sleeping with head head turned to the left and she will turn to look at toys which is promising as I'm hoping this will help the flat head.
Jenna772 wrote:
Hello mum2onelittleman, misskell sent me your post. My son is now 21 months old and he has had a very flat head at the back.

It was around the 12 week old mark that we started noticing and the midwives gave all these suggestions like the rolled up muslin wrap or towel to try to make him lay his head the other way, turning his head and repositioning it (neither of these worked, he just repositioned himself), moving the bassinet and/or laying him the other way in it to see if he would change sides (incase he was facing a direction where there was more light or something that made him feel more secure). We also tried the pillow with a hole in the middle and plenty of tummy time. Unfortunately it just got worse and there seem to be 2 camps in the medical field as to whether it's serious or not.

By the time we were given the helmet therapy option at 9-10 months it was almost too late due to waiting lists and timeframes needed before the fontanelle closes up. So our son did have helmet therapy which helped reshape the head a little but not too much. It was worth it to rectify some shape, as people were commenting and little children were coming up and saying things like he looked like an alien. My son also has hydrocephalus which is not related, so has a large head than normal anyway. Apparently its better to start helmet therapy earlier like at 6-7 months I think.

I would recommend seeing a paediatrician and asking them about whether to see a physio as I think there are also some exercises you can try. It's worth getting it checked that it's not something else and to rule out any problems. The earlier they start observing things the sooner they will be able to make some decisions further down the track, giving you plenty of time if something like helmet therapy can work. It's a bit hit and miss with doctors though as not all believe in the effectiveness of helmet therapy.

Anyway I hope these ideas help and if I think of any others I'll let you know. My son was born early and they said the bone is softer and this is one cause of the flat head, plus he slept on his back like the midwives say they should to help prevent SIDS.



Hey thank you very much for coming on and giving me some great advice. I'm making an appointment to see a pediatrician tomorrow, I just want to fox my little man's wonky head, hopefully the pediatrician I see will do something. I really appreciate your response smile

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JoJo-NZ wrote:
Hi, my DD is the same she is 10 weeks old and has a flat spot on her head and only turns her head to the right. I took her to an osteopath last week who did some manipulation on her neck (not as painful as it sounds) the osteopath said its likeDD has a stiff neck, she did ask me if DD was engaged for a long period which she was. I have noticed over the weekend that she is sleeping with head head turned to the left and she will turn to look at toys which is promising as I'm hoping this will help the flat head.


I second the osteopath route. DD2 had a mild flattening I noticed around the 6 week mark, the CHN and Paed (she was prem so was seeing the Paed for another issue) were fairly unconcerned because it was mild, but she was also very young, so it was only going to get worse. Anyway, I have been taking her to the Osteo and it was a neck issue (now fixed) and we're now working of the correction of the moulding. I have seen a change in shape and she now chooses to put her head fairly evenly in both directions without my involvement. I am very happy with the results we have seen to date.

I also think it is a bit ridiculous to say their hair will cover it, particularly for males as they may end up bald (even if Dad isn't) and it can also effect the shaping and positioning of their facial features (depending on the cause).


I recommend helmet therapy 100% for bubs with a flat head that just wont sort itself out with positioning etc. My 2nd bub had a very distinct slope at the back of his head. Drs werent too concerned and told me not to worry but at 12 weeks of age it was so noticeable and I started to worry about it lots. A friend told me about helmet therapy which not one dr recommended so went to my dr and demanded to look into it. i got a referral to a paediatrician, so the paed could make sure the flat head didnt come about due to any medical problems like tight neck muscles causing the head to prefer laying on the one side etc. Once all cleared for medical reasons (10 minutes) I got the paed to tell me about the helmet therapy. He didnt know much about it at all and actually told me that if he was in my position he wouldnt worry about trying to change the head shape as hair covers it and nobody has the perfect headshape. His words. I was left very very confused. Anyway I bit the bullet and went against what all the 'professionals' and my family were saying, nobody seemed bothered by his head shape at all but it was incredibly noticeable and at 14 weeks it wasnt going to change shape drastically on its own. So against everyones opinion I got the name of the helmet therapy place in Brisbane - I think its called Orthotic Solutions - you dont need a referral from anyone to go there you can just ring up and book an appointment, and I went to my appointment with them and never looked back. They were amazing and so understanding and they know so so much about baby's misshaped heads, they seemed to know so much more than the paed! They really were incredible and even though the helmet looked rediculously silly it helped so much. I cant stress enough how much the helmet made a difference. I havent regretted it for a minute. My bubs head is almost the 'perfect' shape thanks to the helmet. We started the helmet therapy at 4 months. If you wait too long then not even helmet therapy can help so get in early at 4 - 6 months and it is so great. I recommend to book an appointment and go have a chat. it doesnt hurt to ask their opinion. They have seen so many mis-shaped heads in young bubs so they will give you some great advice even if you dont go through with the helmet. I so strongly recommend having a chat to them. I have been so thankful to them and to my friend who told me about the helmet option, as I said earlier not one dr willingly told me about it, most drs dont know anything about it and I had drs ask me why my son was wearing this strange helmet on his head. And not even the paediatrician was concerned. But I went with my gut and decided not to listen to anyone else and I went ahead with the investigation and found orthotic solutions and as soon as they started talking to me about it I new I was doing the right thing. They have seen it all and they know when you should start getting concerned about the head shape. They were fantastic. Look into it and have a chat with them. I am so thankful I did. My little mans head shape is great now.
My daughter has a flat spot I noticed around the 14 week mark - she always slept with her head turned to the right. I fretted about it, and tried to keep her head turned the other way etc, tummy time and all of that. It was severe enough to push one ear forward but it wasn't so obvious to anyone else. My concern was that it would affect her brain development but once I knew that doesn't happen I stopped worrying. She is now 13 months and her hair completely covers it and it is definently improving now that she sleeps on her tummy and is walking. As her head grows it is slowly getting better. When her hair is wet I can see that it is way better than it was.
If it is so obvious that it makes her 'look wrong' then for sure explore other options, such as helmet therapy. But if it isn't that bad I wouldn't worry. It is purely cosmetic and hair does completely cover it. As the head grows it will improve.
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