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Montessori Schools Lock Rss

Ok.. a friend of mine mentioned 'Montessori schools' over the weekend and I saw it come up in a different topic before..

I haven't done any research into it, because the way it was explained to me, it didn't really strike me as something id be interested in.. but now i see this term floating around a bit, im curious.

Has anyone had/or have a child in one of these schools? What are your thoughts and why did you chose this?

Sorry if this is in the wrong section.. didn't really know where to put it, so put it here in Baby General smile

Ok.. a friend of mine mentioned 'Montessori schools' over the weekend and I saw it come up in a different topic before..

I haven't done any research into it, because the way it was explained to me, it didn't really strike me as something id be interested in.. but now i see this term floating around a bit, im curious.

Has anyone had/or have a child in one of these schools? What are your thoughts and why did you chose this?

Sorry if this is in the wrong section.. didn't really know where to put it, so put it here in Baby General smile

I think people should let kids be kids and not impose the latest fads on them.

I think people should let kids be kids and not impose the latest fads on them.



sounded like a fad to me too tbh <img src='https://www.huggies.com.au/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/dry.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='<_<' /> ...

the way i was explained it was there wasn't really a set curriculum and children pursued just what interested them...
isnt that what hobbies are for.. =/

eeep! no one shoot me.. this is how it was explained to me
Another thing which I find interesting about Montessori education is that for some reason kids apparently need expensive versions of old fashioned toys to develop properly.
Montessori isn't a 'fad'...it's been around for more than 100 years and makes up a small minority of the education sector. How it has been explained to you is a bit simplistic and not accurate. While it does allow children freedom to explore what they are interested in, there is a curriculum and structure.

I have often wondered if DS2 would benefit from a Montessori education, however at this stage I don't know enough about it to say one way or the other.

If you really are curious, you can find out more at Montessori Australia.

For the Kiwis there is Montessori NZ.


Definitely not a "fad" Montessori started in Australia in the 60's and as Chippie said has been around internationally for much longer. I looked into this for our kids, but then we moved away and the nearest Montessori is now 40mins away. I didn't find "expensive" versions of old fashioned toys to be the norm at all, quite the opposite.
The focus is on facilitating learning for each individual child at their own level and taking into consideration their own interests and not expecting them to conform to a level or style of learning as dictated by the majority. Lots of montessori schools have open days where you can observe the classroom activities, if you're actually serious about finding out about their style and philosophy you should go to one, it's very inspiring smile
Thanks for the responses..

I guess what I'm curious about is the stuff like.. reading, writing, maths, science etc... are they still going to be taught these things?? like.. in such a way they will not be behind children going through the regular school system?


The focus is on facilitating learning for each individual child at their own level and taking into consideration their own interests and not expecting them to conform to a level or style of learning as dictated by the majority.

Personally I disagree with this approach to teaching. Yes it's important to teach "holistically", but kids need to learn real-life skills and how to deal with real life situations like failure, disappointment and challenges in general.
I think kids nowadays tend to lack resilience and ingenuity. Just my opinion.
When my DS goes to school I will try to find one that focuses on teaching maths, English (reading and writing), science and arts, and I will let him pursue his own interests at home.
Yes, they still learn all those things it's just not as structured as you would get in a mainstream school.

but kids need to learn real-life skills and how to deal with real life situations like failure, disappointment and challenges in general.

From what I've observed and know of Montessori it is much more successful at teaching "real-life" than mainstream schools.

Is this similar to the Steiner Schools? I've heard a few things about them too but not really 100% sure. Or are they completely different, I have no idea. Just curious smile

I'm not very clued up on Steiner, parts of their philosophy appealed, but overall I think it would suit one of my children but the other two not so much. To me it seems a little less structured than Montessori in some ways and then very strict in other areas. One thing I do know that didn't appeal to me was that the class only moves forward when everyone was ready, as in at the same level. With Montessori each child has the freedom to move at their own pace without being held up by others in the class.

Yes, they still learn all those things it's just not as structured as you would get in a mainstream school.




From what I've observed and know of Montessori it is much more successful at teaching "real-life" than mainstream schools.


You are wise. grin wub



Is this similar to the Steiner Schools? I've heard a few things about them too but not really 100% sure. Or are they completely different, I have no idea. Just curious smile


Steiner is different, they have a more spiritual approach to learning I think than Montessori. Rudolf Steiner designed the education out of his spiritual scientific research of man as a threefold being of spirit, soul, and body whose capacities unfold in three developmental stages on the path to adulthood, and as such adapted his curriculum to work with those stages. Underlying this curriculum is the understanding that if children are able to relate what they learn to their own experience, they will be interested and alive, and then everything they learn becomes their own. Rudolf Steiner/Waldorf schools work to foster this kind of learning.

Steiner (also known as Waldorf) is not as 'big' as Montessori, for example there are only 9 schools in all of NZ who offer it while there are 72 ECE centres in NZ and 27 Primary and high schools in NZ classed as Montessori.


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