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Breastfeeding tips Rss

I am 38 weeks pregnant and am completely looking forward to the birth (well sort of).

What I am scared about is the breastfeeding issue. With DD#1 I was unable to breastfeed due to latching problems, thus I ended up bottle feeding.

Are there any tips on how to get #2 to latch properly? The midwives at the hospital can be breast natsies at times, and this is the one thing that I am not looking forward to.
At our local hospital, they held breastfeeding classes which I found very helpful. I also found my midwives to be excellent, so view them with an open mind - hopefully you'll get a good one. I think it's important to be realistic about breastfeeding - in the early days it can be very helpful, and not necessarily "natural" so ask for help while still in the hospital. Even though I didn't have any problems feeding DD1 I still asked for the demonstrations and help for DD2 as all babies are different. Good luck, fingers crossed for you!

I am 38 weeks pregnant and am completely looking forward to the birth (well sort of).

What I am scared about is the breastfeeding issue. With DD#1 I was unable to breastfeed due to latching problems, thus I ended up bottle feeding.

Are there any tips on how to get #2 to latch properly? The midwives at the hospital can be breast natsies at times, and this is the one thing that I am not looking forward to.


Hi!
The only thing that I would say is just be open to try various feeding positions. I thought the biggest thing for the first day was working out what position my DS wanted to feed in. He was quite a big bub and my boobs were bigger than his big head so he liked the 'football' hold and reclined back into a pillow I'd put behind him. He was slightly refluxy and didn't like positions where he was laying down for his feeds.
Best of Luck!
smile
i would suggest you contact the Breast feeding association. i was looking on there web site the other day and have downloaded an ebook called breastfeeding with confidence, I have only had a quick look so far but it might help you too.

Two beautiful girls, hubby working from home makes one happy mumma smile
[url=http://lilypie.com][img]http://lb2f.lilypie.com...]

ask for help and keep asking till you get it right.

i had issues with DS1 and only bf for 3 weeks. thought i'd at least give it a go for DS2, even if it was only for a few weeks and ended up bf for 6 months and it was so much easier. so every bub is different, and this one may have no trouble latching on. hope #2 was is as easy for you as it was for me.

Good Luck!
I think the ABA also have breastfeeding classes.
Ask for help at the hospital, and ask every single time you feed, even if they're telling you that you're doing it right.
You'll have at least two midwives look after you - day shift and night shift, so make sure you get the attention of both of them.
If you feel one isn't helping you too much don't be afraid to ask for someone else to help! Seriously. They may be a little bit offended, but a few minutes of hurt feelings is better than many months of not breastfeeding.

Read as much as you can from everywhere. Breastfeeding is really hard to get a hang of. It's a learnt thing for BOTH you and your baby. It's natural to struggle with it, and even if you get the hang of it, you might find you need help a few weeks on.

Just remember there are lots of options to try before you give up.
Hopefully it all goes smoothly for you, and you can feed for as long as you want. smile
Hi smile
At the breastfeeding class at the hospital we watched a video on "baby led attachment". It was AMAZING.
The babies can do it themselves!
I tried it with my son and since birth we have had an awesome bf relationship.
I find that the more I "help" him latch, the harder it is for the both of us. So I just let him go for it.
When we were first learning, I found that if we would start to get a bit frazzled, I'd take mine and his tops off for skin to skin contact and it seemed to get us more "in sync". Lots of topless cuddles!
Also, it's hard to feed when the baby is crying. So it's a good idea to let them suck on a clean finger (middle finger - pad to the roof of their mouth) before you try to put them on. They will calm down enough to not get frustrated if they can't latch on. Always try to feed a calm baby - look for their early hunger cues (licking lips, jerky movements, etc).
The best advice I can give is "chest to chest and chin to breast". Hold baby on your chest, make sure he/she is facing in toward you. Tease his/her nose with your nipple to get them to open up wide enough (especially in the early days they may be a bit too tired/lazy to open wide enough - DS was anyways). The midwives told me that you shouldn't be able to see any aerola under his bottom lip, and just a little bit around his top lip.
This is what has helped me and my son - it may be different for you. He is 14 weeks old now and I will continue to feed him for as long as he wants.
I hope this helps. When I was still pregnant I watched a lot of YouTube videos on breastfeeding 'cause I really wanted to be able to do it. I think it really helped; especially since I don't recall watching anyone breastfeed...I didn't really know what to do. There are some good videos on Baby Led Attachment and the "Breast Crawl" is fascinating too - it helped my confidence with Bf. There are some good tips on YouTube on getting a good latch (one is a one handed technique)
I really hope you can breastfeed, it is an amazing experience, and so great for your (and your babys) health and relationship.
smile
every baby is different. I fully fed my 1st no problems and just this week at 5 weeks old had to stop with my 2nd after 5 weeks of breast feeding hell.
Have requested the e-book from the ABA website. Will have a look at it tomorrow when I get a bit of time to myself while DD#1 is in daycare and DH is still away on shift.

Thanks for your support and tips. I went up there the other Sunday and a lot of the breast feeding natsies have since moved on, so hopefully I'll get some really good midwives.
have a look on the aba website as they actually run group meetings that are great for support and also breastfeeding classes in certain areas.
www.breastfeeding.asn.au and they also have 1800 MUM 2 MUM that you can ring 24 hours a day for help from a trained breastfeeding counsellor.
Midwives will all give you different advice. listen to them all and then if it doesnt sit well with you or doesnt work, discard it.
lactation consultants tend to be far better when it comes to helping with latch etc.
read books too. "breastfeeding...Naturally" is the book that the ABA gives you when you join up with them and its quite good.

and just remember that no two babies or experiences will be the same so hopefully this baby just feeds nicely for you smile (and mine too!)
The ABA also have lactation consultants you can access for free, I'd contact them before bub's born just in case. BF for me has been a MAJOR drama and the only reason I'm still going at 7 weeks is because of the LC at my hospital. I still find it difficult to latch my little guy but thanks to her showing me the steps a million times we always get there eventually. I contacted the ABA when DS was 8 days old, the day before I saw my LC for the first time, and they said there are breastfeeding groups and LCs available to everyone free, you just need to find the one in your area. Have a look on the website or send them an email for the details. Also, if BF was difficult last time the LC at your hospital should see you if you ask them? Good luck, not long now!
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