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  5. Kids party invite stating no gifts?

Kids party invite stating no gifts? Rss

My son received a party invite to a 4 year olds birthday. It said you don't have to bring a gift. It seems a bit unusual to turn up to a child's party without a present... especially if others felt the same and had a present.... then I read online this is apparently something ppl do, but i hadn't seen before? What are your thoughts & what would you do? I was thinking to just take a small gift like a book or something?
For me I think it would depend on the wording. If it said 'please don't bring a gift' then I wouldn't, but if it said 'don't feel that you need to bring a gift' then I would.

That is pretty weird for a 4 year old though!




"Parenting is the easiest thing in the world to have an opinion about, but the hardest thing in the world to do."

I would feel uncomfortable turning up without a present. Birthday parties are a time to celebrate the child's special day. Poor kids would be expecting presents smile
Hmm I can see where the mum is coming from but the poor 4yr old lol

I have dds 4th party on Sunday and I can already imagine what her toy collection is going to look like after but it's always fun giving and receiving so I'd never turn down either!

What about buying an awesome book and writing in it as if it's the card? Sneaky loophole there wink







A small book, or something personalised, or even a few helium balloons would really make him happy I think. I agree, little fella will be heartbroken... But don't want to upset mum & dad, har one...
Zinkles wrote:
For me I think it would depend on the wording. If it said 'please don't bring a gift' then I wouldn't, but if it said 'don't feel that you need to bring a gift' then I would.

That is pretty weird for a 4 year old though!


I agree with Zinkles. You should check the actual wording.
I can sympathise with the kid's parents actually. Our eldest has special needs, and while his current tastes and interests are now more mainstream, when he was younger (like 4 and under) it was really hard for friends and family to understand what he liked as he had a very narrow range of interests. They would, with good intentions, buy him all sorts of books, toys and educational things "to expand his interests" not realising it was just a pile of stuff that would never get used (and would get subsequently regifted, sold, donated to charity or just thrown out) and we would have much preferred some vouchers to buy something he actually wanted or something he would actually use. At parties he was just happy there was cake and other treats and other kids to play with, and having more than a few gifts was overwhelming anyway.
Do you think the kid's parents might be thinking this way too?
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