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  5. Daycare fee's could increase adding $120 a week

Daycare fee's could increase adding $120 a week Rss

Hi i thought some people would be interested in this story on thr rise of daycare fee's, also the story is on weekend sunrise


Date: June 13 2010



Rachel Browne


THE families of more than 500,000 children in long-daycare centres could face fee increases of up to $120 a week under federal government changes, starting from next month.

The reforms are aimed at improving early childhood education but may actually make it unaffordable for thousands of those families.

Long-daycare centres - the largest provider of preschool services in NSW - are expected to increase fees by up to $24 a day to meet requirements under the government's National Quality Framework.

About 45,000 families in NSW will be affected by the increases.

Childcare NSW president Lyn Connolly, representing 80 per cent of long-daycare centres, said disadvantaged children would be worst hit: ''Potentially thousands of children will miss out on any form of early childhood education. The government has said fees will only go up by $4 to $6 a day but we estimate they will go up by $14 to $24 a day.

''Children from lower socio-economic areas do not have a hope in Hades of getting in. Those children will be at home all day, probably spending half the day in front of the television, because their parents can't afford to get them into an early learning program.''

There are 2200 long-daycare centres in NSW, with fees up to $125 a day at the most expensive. A family with one child attending five days a week could pay up to $745 a week under the increases. But they would be entitled to the 50 per cent childcare tax rebate, capped at $7778 a year per child.

Children also have the option of 800 community-based preschools in NSW, which cost about $40 a day, or the 100 NSW Department of Education preschools, which carry a voluntary contribution fee of as little as $2 a day.

While places at long daycare will not decrease, they will become more expensive under the changes, which require centres to lift staff-to-child ratios and employ more qualified workers in the next six years.

Early Childhood Australia chief executive Pam Cahir said fees would have to go up: ''Obviously if centres are going to employ more staff and if they are going to employ qualified staff, the fees will rise. Whether that cost is borne by the government or by the parents, we don't know. It remains to be seen.''

Both federal and state governments have increased funding to support early childhood education. The former is providing the state with $270 million over five years to ensure all four-year-olds have at least 15 hours of preschool a week under its universal access policy. But the Council of Social Service NSW (NCOSS) said the distribution of funding was uneven and might not meet the demands of community-based preschools, which represent 22 per cent of the sector and suffered a funding freeze between 1989 and 2006. Community-based preschools have received about $50 million in state and federal funding over the past four years.

''Because of the way it has been distributed, some preschools - about 15 per cent - have not received a funding increase and some may have only had a very small increase; some as little as $1000,'' NCOSS director Alison Peters said. ''It is these preschools that may be struggling.''

Leanne Gibbs, acting chief executive of the Community Childcare Co-operative, which represents the community-based sector, said there was uncertainty over continued funding: ''The government funding we have received is welcome because it has allowed centres to make fees more affordable. We just really hope they sustain that level of funding. We have to consider whether it's going to be long-term. We don't know how long the government is going to commit to it.''

Cost pressures on long-daycare and community-based centres have increased demand for places at Department of Education-run preschools. There are only about 100 DET preschools in NSW, concentrated in Sydney's west, south-west and inner-west.

Numerous studies have shown preschool attendance improves a child's performance at school.

''Children who attend high-quality early childhood education centres with a high staff-to-child ratio in place where they are taught by four-year qualified teachers tend to do better once they get into primary school,'' Ms Cahir said. ''Children who attend high-calibre learning programs become more productive in the future.''

Only 60 per cent of NSW children attend preschool, compared with 90 per cent in other states.

Roxanne Elliott, founder of childcare resource Care for Kids, said this led to large discrepancies in ability once children reached school.

''When children head off to big school, there are wildly varying levels of ability,'' she said. ''You have some kids who can read and write while others don't know the alphabet. It's a difficult area for teachers to grapple with.

''There needs to be a greater level of consistency across the board for children transitioning to school.''

An assessment of all NSW kindergarten students this year illustrated the point: some read fluently while others can not grip a pencil correctly.

NSW primary school principals are campaigning for preschools to be attached to all government schools. But a spokeswoman for the Department of Education said there were no plans to increase numbers.
unfortunately for us we will just have to cross that bridge when we come to it. i am very happy with our cc and dont see any need for increase in staff etc etc etc. just the government thinking they are taking a step forward when really rhey are taking 2 steps back.
I too agree with the previous poster. My daycare is run very well and im happy with what my kids are learning - after all they are small kids, the need to learn to paint and sing - not read and write this is the purpose of school.
I was talking about the cost of daycare with DP the other day and when my son first went to daycare the full price was $48.90 now its up to $67.80, and now another price increase, where does it end. It makes it so hard with families who have no choice but to work.


''Children from lower socio-economic areas do not have a hope in Hades of getting in. Those children will be at home all day, probably spending half the day in front of the television, because their parents can't afford to get them into an early learning program.''



Love this quote, pretty much saying just because your poor your a a useless parent lol. when will people learn hat your child doesn't need to attend CC or preschool to learn.

I am a big supporter of CC and believe that staff need to be further education and better conditions in order to provide a quality service. I do however believe that the government should subsidise the improvement especially for working and studying parents.

I am in two minds where I stand on this one. I have a couple of thoughts ...

One It is 'child care'! It's not school. Its a service for working parents to have their children looked after so if costs are going to increase that much we are going to have a lot of parents who will find it more economical to stay home rather than work which creates problems right there!

Two. I think kids should left to be kids until they are at least 4 or 5yrs of age (which is when they are off to structured learning in pre-school, kindy, school etc). I don't see the need for 'qualified' early childhood teachers (who yes do deserve a higher wage) in childcare when kids learn best under the age of 4 through play based learning and not structured learning!

Two. I think kids should left to be kids until they are at least 4 or 5yrs of age (which is when they are off to structured learning in pre-school, kindy, school etc). I don't see the need for 'qualified' early childhood teachers (who yes do deserve a higher wage) in childcare when kids learn best under the age of 4 through play based learning and not structured learning!


i agree with the above too. they are kids. let them startall their 'structured' learning when they actually go to school. my kids are not in cc to get an early start on their education, they are there purely and simply because they have to be.

''Children from lower socio-economic areas do not have a hope in Hades of getting in. Those children will be at home all day, probably spending half the day in front of the television, because their parents can't afford to get them into an early learning program.''


As soon as I read this paragraph I immediately thought of my SIL and one of my cousins..... SIL has bought up all of her 6 kids this way. TV on and leave the kids to do as they please. She does not talk to them to encourage them to learn to speak and communicate, she does not teach them colours, counting, nothing. She is a prime example of a person from a low socio-economic area who never has and will never work. She has 2 out of school now, 3 in primary school and one toddler.... I had hoped that she would have learn't from the eldest... but sadly not.

I am not bagging the area that she lives in... lol... I live on the same street. But, this is a very very poor area and sadly I see far too many people like her around me. She is not giving her kids a decent start in life. Schooling starts at home, the same a discipline, it DOES NOT START AT SCHOOL!

Having said all that.... she did have her kids picked up from home, dropped off at a childcare centre, all meals provided, dropped home again all for $1 a day! She chose to only send them a day or 2 a week!!!!!

My cousin is not better, he does nothing to encourage his 2 young children to learn and get ahead. His girlfriend is no better and it breaks my heart. They are so lazy and so self involved that they can't see that their lifestyle has such a huge impact on their children.

We have Emily in childcare 1 day a week. In my opinion she does not need it to improve her speech, nor her social skills or skill levels in general. Sure it will help her, I am not doubting that one bit, but I have her in so that she actually gets to play with other kids.... she was craving kids... lol

We can only afford 1 day a week and we are not entitled to any rebate, so we just have to accept it if the price rises. If it becomes far too unaffordable then I just have to start taking her to more parks etc so that she gets to play with other kids.... although a day at childcare in a more educational environment is my preference.

Is OVER rude people

I just extracted this quote

Instead, the government wants, by the end of the year, one carer for every four infants younger than two.


from this article The Australian


That makes me think it would only increase the cost for under 2s?????

It also said the reforms wanted all childcare workers to have formal qualifications. It was my understanding (as told by my CC director) that this was already the case - you have to get the Cert III in whatever within 2 years or you lose your job.
Here is a link to the DEEWR site, which provides a very detailed outlines of some of the issues that has been outlined here, but also how the National Quality Standards with effect Early Childhood services, the new early learning frameworks which services will need to respond to within policies, and interactions with children and families etc.
Quite complex stuff, but certainly aimed at improving the care and education that Early Childhood services provide.

http://www.deewr.gov.au/EarlyChildhood/Policy_Agenda/Pages/home.aspx
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