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Fruchoc ... A link between digestion and excema you say??

I am gluten intolerant.

Ds1 had severe excema as a baby till I stopped BFing when he was 6mths old. When he turned 6 out of the blue his excema on his lower legs only has been really bad. I never correlated diet to his excema I always assumed something environmental but you've got me thinking now ..

Fruchoc ... A link between digestion and excema you say??

I am gluten intolerant.

Ds1 had severe excema as a baby till I stopped BFing when he was 6mths old. When he turned 6 out of the blue his excema on his lower legs only has been really bad. I never correlated diet to his excema I always assumed something environmental but you've got me thinking now ..


It can be environmental triggers too. But more commonly it is related to the digestive system. According to my Naturopath anyway. And what he explains does make sense to me.

He said that our digestion system has certain stages. When the system comes across something that it can not break down properly, for example dairy being a common one, it causes what is called leaky gut syndrome. Which means that the digestive system pushes out into the body what it can't properly digest, so it has to go somewhere else. Sometimes it is peoples skin that is affected, and sometimes their gut itself so they feel nauseous. My Nat claims that 90% of skin disorders are directly related to the digestive system.

In my DD's case, that turned out to be correct. She had severe eczema as a baby, but once I cut dairy from my diet it almost disappeared. And now at 6 years old she is anaphylactic to all dairy products. And I should note, never gets eczema anymore.

I'm not saying this is the case with all children and adults with eczema, but it is certainly food for thought. So to speak. wink

I might also add that 90% of people with an O Positive blood group are intolerant to wheat and/or gluten in Australia.

Yet, if they travel overseas, to say New Zealand or Europe, they find they can tolerate eating normal bread there.

I can't remember what exactly it is, but its something that Australia do to their wheat crops that the other countries don't. I must find the notes and chase it up cos I can't remember the exact reason.

Most people can be intolerant to wheat/gluten and not even know it cos it might just make them feel bloated or flat after eating it. But that is still an intolerance.

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